The culprit in methamphetamine-induced psychosis is very likely BDNF

Psychoses. Credit: NIH (Publication Number 15-4209) & Neuronicus.
Psychoses. Credit: NIH (Publication Number 15-4209) & Neuronicus. License: PD.

Methamphetamine prolonged use may lead to psychotic episodes in the absence of the drug. These episodes are persistent and closely resemble schizophrenia. One of the (many) molecules involved in both schizophrenia and meth abuse is BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor), a protein mainly known for its role in neurogenesis and long-term memory.

Lower BDNF levels have been observed in schizophrenia, therefore Manning et al. (2015) wondered if it’s also involved in meth-induced psychosis. So they got normal mice and mice that were genetically engineered to express lower levels of BDNF. They gave them meth for 3 weeks, with escalating doses form one week to the next. Interestingly, no meth on weekends, which made me rapidly scroll to the beginning of the paper and confirm my suspicion that the experiments were not done in USA; if they were, the grad students would not have had the weekends off and mice would have received meth every day, including weekends. Look how social customs can influence research! Anyway, social commentary aside, after the meth injections, the researchers let the mice untroubled for 2 more weeks. And then they tested them on a psychosis test.

How do you measure psychosis in rodents? By inference, since the mouse will not grab your coat and tell you about the newly appeared hypnotizing wall pattern and the like. Basically, it was observed that psychotic people have a tendency to walk in a disorganized manner when given the opportunity to explore, a behavior that was also observed in rodents on amphetamines. This disorganized walk can be quantifies into an entropic index, which is thought to reflect occurrence of psychosis (I know, a lot of inferring. But you come up with a better model of psychosis in rodent!).

Manning et al. (2015) gave their mice amphetamine to mimic psychosis and then observed their behavior. And the results were that the genetically engineered mice to express less BDNF showed reduced psychosis (i.e. had a lower entropic index). In conclusion, the alteration of the BDNF pathway may be responsible for the development of psychosis in methamphetamine users.

Reference: Manning EE, Halberstadt AL, & van den Buuse M. (Epub 9 Oct 2015). BDNF-Deficient Mice Show Reduced Psychosis-Related Behaviors Following Chronic Methamphetamine. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 1–5. doi: 10.1093/ijnp/pyv116. Article | FREE FULLTEXT PDF

By Neuronicus, 9 November 2015

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