Are you in love with an animal?

Sugar Candy Hearts by Petr Kratochvil. License: PD
Sugar Candy Hearts by Petr Kratochvil taken from publicdomainpictures. License: PD

Ren et al. (2015) gave sweet drink (Fanta), sweet food (Oreos), salty–vinegar food (Lays chips) or water to 422 people and then asked them about their romantic relationship; or, if they didn’t have one, about a hypothetical relationship. For hitched people, the foods or drinks had no effect on the evaluation of their relationship. In contrast, the singles who received sweets were more eager to initiate a relationship with a potential partner and evaluated more favorably a hypothetical relationship (how do you do that? I mean, if it’s hypothetical… why wouldn’t you evaluate it favorably from your singleton perspective?) Anyway, the singles who got sweets tend see things a little more on the rosy side, as opposed to the taken ones.

The rationale for doing this experiment is that metaphors alter our perceptions (fair enough). Given that many terms of endearment include reference to the taste of sweet, like “Honey”, “Sugar” or “Sweetie”, maybe this is not accidental or just a metaphor and, if we manipulate the taste, we manipulate the perception. Wait, what? Now re-read the finding above.

The authors take their results as supporting the view that “metaphorical thinking is one fundamental way of perceiving the world; metaphors facilitate social cognition by applying concrete concepts (e.g., sweet taste) to understand abstract concepts (e.g., love)” (p. 916).

So… I am left with many questions, the first being: if the sweet appelatives in a romantic relationship stem from an extrapolation of the concrete taste of sweet to an abstract concept like love, then, I wonder, what kind of concrete concept is being underlined in the prevalence of “baby” as a term of endearment? Do I dare speculate what the metaphor stands for? Should people who are referred to as “baby” by their partners alert the authorities for a possible pedophile ideation? And what do we do about the non-English cultures (apparently non-Germanic or non-Mandarin too) in which the lovey-dovey terms tend to cluster around various small objects (e.g. tassels), vegetables (e.g. pumpkin), cute onomatopoeics (I am at a loss for transcription here), or baby animals (e.g. chick, kitten, puppy). Believe me, such cultures do exist and are numerous. “Excuse me, officer, I suspect my partner is in love with an animal. Oh, wait, that didn’t come out right…”

Ok, maybe I missed something with this paper, as half-way through I failed to maintain proper focus due to an intruding – and disturbing! – image of a man, a chicken, and a tassel. So take the authors’ words when they say that their study “not only contributes to the literature on metaphorical thinking but also sheds light on an understudied factor that influences relationship initiation, that of taste” (p. 918). Oh, metaphors, how sweetly misleading you are…

Please use the “Comments” section below to share the strangest metaphor used as term of endearment you have ever heard in a romantic relationship.

Reference: Ren D, Tan K, Arriaga XB, & Chan KQ (Nov 2015). Sweet love: The effects of sweet taste experience on romantic perceptions. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 32(7): 905 – 921. DOI: 10.1177/0265407514554512. Article | FREE FULLTEXT PDF

By Neuronicus, 21 October 2015

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